Michiel Huisman took ‘Months’ to Master Corralling Pigs

Dutch star Michiel Huisman has revealed he took “months and months” to master corralling pigs.Michiel Huisman took “months and months” to master corralling pigs for ‘The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society’.

The 36-year-old actor plays farmer Dawsey in Mike Newell’s new movie and he admitted he was nervous about getting as close as possible to the swine.

He explained to Grazia magazine: “It took months and months of rehearsing.

“Dawsey has a special connection with animals. So, we were shooting it in a very intimate way, camera really close and it was just the pig, the camera and myself. Huisman will take on the role of Stephen Crane, the oldest Crane sibling and a published writer of supernatural books — including a memoir about his family’s time living at Hill House.

“Mike was saying, ‘get closer, I’m not getting it’ and I was like, ‘My god, do you see how big this animal is?”

Michiel has a 10-year-old daughter, Hazel, with his partner Tara Elders and he doesn’t think he’d have been able to convincingly play a single father in the movie if he wasn’t a dad himself. The film, which is being financed by StudioCanal, is based on the book of the same name by Annie Barros and Mary Ann Shaffer.

He said: “I had a lot of scenes with this wonderful little girl and I wouldn’t even know if I would be able to do that if I didn’t have that experience as a father.”

Parenthood has given the former ‘Game of Thrones’ actor a new focus for his career.Mike Newell will direct the project from a script by Don Roos and Tom Bezucha. The film, which is being financed by StudioCanal, is based on the best-selling book of the same name by Annie Barros and Mary Ann Shaffer.

He explained: “Before Tara and I had a child, I don’t think I had such a sense of purpose or direction.

“And all of a sudden, I understood that I was an actor not only because I love making movies, but also because it’s how I can provide for my family. I like that grounding.”

He said: “Someone’s gotta do it. I think it’s much more prevalent in European cinema – definitely in Dutch cinema.

“At the end of the day, it’s just my job. But now I’m going to just shut up because otherwise people are gonna be like, ‘Hey, so what else did he do?'”

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